Jolitz Heritage - Published

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Archive of published works of various kinds by Jolitz. An essential part of the Jolitz Heritage has been widespread publication, commentary, and opinion. Literally hundreds of these items that are slowly being assembled into this site. Check back soon both for missing older items and new ones as well!

Designing a Software Specification
In this first installment of a multipart series, the design specification for 386BSD, Berkeley UNIX for the 80386, is discussed.

Three Initial PC Utilities
Utilities to let you execute GCC-compiled programs in protected mode from MS-DOS and copy files to a shared portion of disk so MS-DOS and UNIX can exchange information.

The Standalone System
Using the protected mode program loader, a minimal 80386 protected mode standalone C programming environment for operating systems kernel development is created.

Language Tools Cross Support
A Stripped-Down Kernel
Multiprogramming and Multiprocessing I
Device Autoconfiguration
Unix Device Drivers II
Interfaces to the operating system. Entering, exiting and masking processor interrupts.

Completion of basic 386BSD device drivers.

Missing Pieces I
Finishing the NET/2 release of Berkeley UNIX to obtain a complete, unencumbered system for the 386 PC. Describes the methodology and implementation of the remaining facilities necessary to generate a working operating system for the PC.

The Final Step: Running Light with 386bsd
Coming to Grips with the Information Age
William Jolitz writes on the seperated evolution of the Internet apart from the world's largest connected network - the telephone system, as he reviews Global Telecommunications: Layered Networks, Layered Services by Robert Heldman.

Most programmers are aware of the ISO-9660 standard and its significance in sharing CD-ROM data between different platforms. In our article "Inside the ISO-9660 Filesystem Format" (DDJ, December 1992), we examined how this standard has encouraged the use of CD-ROM technology and how a modern ISO-9660 CD-ROM is structured. ISO-compliant CD-ROMs are interchangeable and can be used on any type of system and architecture. However, the minimalism that helped make the ISO-9660 standard successful may sometimes be too minimal for specific applications (such as distributing POSIX-based, bootable CD-ROMs). Because ISO-9660 does not adequately support the POSIX filesystem, the Rock Ridge Group was formed to develop ISO-9660:1988 extensions, which take advantage of the system-use area of the directory record (provided for in ISO-9660) to store complete POSIX filesystem information.

Extending Standards for CD-ROM
Most programmers are aware of the ISO-9660 standard and its significance in sharing CD-ROM data between different platforms. In our article "Inside the ISO-9660 Filesystem Format" (DDJ, December 1992), we examined how this standard has encouraged the use of CD-ROM technology and how a modern ISO-9660 CD-ROM is structured. ISO-compliant CD-ROMs are interchangeable and can be used on any type of system and architecture. However, the minimalism that helped make the ISO-9660 standard successful may sometimes be too minimal for specific applications (such as distributing POSIX-based, bootable CD-ROMs). Because ISO-9660 does not adequately support the POSIX filesystem, the Rock Ridge Group was formed to develop ISO-9660:1988 extensions, which take advantage of the system-use area of the directory record (provided for in ISO-9660) to store complete POSIX filesystem information.

Under Lock and Key
While you can't keep network systems and data under lock and key, there are security techniques you can still employ. Lynne examines the approaches presented in UNIX System Security and UNIX Installation, Security, and Integrity.

Very High Speed Networks: HiPPI and SIGNA
Polymorphic Protocols
Perspectives on Computer Security
When you get on the net, who can you trust? Lynne examines several new books that address this question: Network Security: Private Communications in a Public World, by Charlie Kaufman, Radia Perlman, and Michael Speciner; E-Mail Security, by Bruce Schneier; Network Security, by Steven Shaffer and Alan Simon; and Network Security: How to Plan for It and Achieve It, by Richard H. Baker.

DNS on the Hot Seat
Distributed DOS attacks on the Internet's root servers can grind Web traffic to a halt. Is it time to find a replacement for DNS?

DDOS: Just a Matter of Resource
Web Services and DataCenter Environments
Forget your cellphones and wireless PDAs. Web services can be used even more effectively in Internet datacenters to solve client communication errors and other such problems.

Paving the Way for ‘Systers’
On Sept. 9, Anita Borg, a well-known computer scientist and champion for the advancement of women in the technology industry who died in April, was eulogized by colleagues at Stanford University's Memorial Auditorium. Here are the thoughts of Lynne Greer Jolitz, who has spearheaded several Silicon Valley Startups.

Memories and Cookies
Buffer, Buffer, Where is the Buffer?
Last year, I attended a Silicon Valley emerging technology talk which used some of my earlier work in ballistic protocol processing to produce reliable wireless TV-quality streaming video-you know, so you can watch "Shrek" at Starbucks on the fly and it actually is smooth and enjoyable-not jittery and abrupt (if you're lucky). Anyone who's struggled with snagging a simple web page off the Internet knows how annoyingly seductive it is to get media on-demand, especially when you're sipping your coffee, life is good, and you really want to see the latest news. Then, just when it seems you'll get that story, some item just doesn't make it through, and it just keeps hammering and hammering. That's the annoying. But you've got most of it, and know it's almost all there waiting for you. That's the seductive. Now, "emerging tech" in Silicon Valley isn't some ten years out academic concept-they're really talking more like two years out. These days it takes about nine months end-to-end to develop, build, test, and qualify an 802.11 wireless product. Most value adds (like, believe it or not, making it TV-quality) are supposed to require only three months of additional work (most of it is done in parallel-this is how we optimists plan products these days). Of course, everyone slips schedule, and specs get changed and markets take left turns, so add in a year. In other words, emerging tech is now a product in two years. No wonder the "R" in R&D doesn't seem to get on schedule anymore. The talk was well received, and the questions very cogent. That alone impressed me - it is very difficult to get a handle on all the aspects of video transmission, coupled with Internet transmission issues, and then include wireless transmission issues. The bushel of standards, acronyms, and terms of art alone filled the room. It demonstrated that Silicon Valley is still the place to be for inventors and entrepreneurs. The next day, though, an enthusiastic engineer who keeps everything in his head informed me proudly that he had cogitated on the matter and decided that reliable wireless video streaming was achievable with buffering alone and since buffering is already done, there is no problem.

The Problems of Personalization
Free Culture And the Internet
Lynne Jolitz reviews the book Free Culture by Lawrence Lessig.

The Year Ahead
Search Engine Quirks and Search Engine Jerks
Misplaced software priorities
We are in danger of losing out in the best and most interesting part of the software market.

Opinion: Getting "Beyond Fear": A Security Expert's Prescription for A Safer World
Open source pioneer Lynne Jolitz turns a skeptical eye toward airport security, wondering if all the pat-downs and X-rays are good policy. While politicians and the public debate whether the searches are too intrusive, Lynne says that's the wrong question. The real question is whether the searches are cost-effective. Are they the best way we can be spending our security effort and money?

Innovation After Grokster
The Google Test
We are in danger of losing out in the best and most interesting part of the software market.

Geek of the Week Award
The Symmetric 375 and Symmetrix Owner's Manual
The 386BSD Release 1.0 CDROM Liner Notes
We are pleased to present the release of our first official 386BSD Reference CD-ROM. This single CD-ROM contains the most up-to-date work in our continuing operating systems and networking research project including articles appearing in Dr. Dobb's Journal, select annotations, system and kernel source code, and executable binaries for select configurations. This CD-ROM is intended as a research and educational reference used to explore state-of the-art paradigms, choices, and trade-offs, as well as examine testbed implementations of these design choices. In addition, the collection of resources, articles, and other reference materials on this CD creates an informational programming resource that can be referred to again and again.

Operating System Source Code Secrets Volume 1: The Basic Kernel
386bsd カーネルソースコードの秘密
Faktor 10: Stauende; IP-Netze bis zu zehnmal schneller durch SiliconTCP
The Unknown Hackers
Bill and Lynne Jolitz may be the most famous programmers you've never heard of. Not many Linux-come-latelies know this, but Linux was actually the second open-source Unix-based operating system for personal computers to be distributed over the Internet. The first was 386BSD, which was put together by an extraordinary couple named Bill and Lynne Jolitz. In a 1993 interview in Meta magazine, Linus Torvalds himself name-checked their O.S. "If 386BSD had been available when I started on Linux," he said, "Linux would probably never have happened."

Apple's Next Step is a Software Gamble
Steve Jobs has persuaded Apple Computer Inc. to spend $400 million, mostly in cash, to buy his Next Software Inc., convincing Apple executives that it can fill a technological hole at the company Mr. Jobs co-founded 20 years ago. The deal is a coup for 41-year-old Mr. Jobs, who owns half of Next and who has tried to take it public for years. The big question: Is it a similarly good deal for Apple? ... discussing the abrupt acquisition of Next, William Jolitz expressed optimism that this acquisition, if handled appropriately, could be a good opportunity for Apple

Darwin/Mac OS X: The Fifth BSD
[William Jolitz] posted a fully compilable and bootable system for personal computers built with the Intel 386 CPU. This release was the first of the 386BSD distribution.

Automatic Security Leak
Talk About Legacy Machines
Spotlight on "Hidden Physicists"
Cyberbullying 101
How Do We Categorize Our Industry?
Digging Silicon Valley's roots: some Homebrew Computer club & other newsletters online
Why so few women in tech? It's Anthro 101
Where Are All the Women?
Intel Develops Hardware To Enhance TCP/IP Stacks
In Silicon Valley, it's often who you know
Jurisdiction and the Information Superhighway
An individual in Tennessee downloads a pornographic image from a computer located in California, initiating an action brought by Tennessee authorities against the California business which owns the computer. Since the Internet spans not only state and federal jurisdictions but also international boundaries, the question of just who has personal jurisdiction impacts the choice of which laws to apply to commerce on the Internet. This question of jurisdiction is pivotal if we are to resolve the emerging conflicts just beginning to manifest themselves in the area of communications and technology commerce.

In this paper, the author argues for a doctrine independent of the technology itself to resolve these questions of personal jurisdiction to arrive at an obvious and equitable resolution of the conflict. 1 Since the basis of any legal system is that it be valid, reasonable, certain, flexible and knowable, the lack of clear rulings with respect to jurisdiction and Internet com- merce have led to confusion. In sum, the current doctrine is not knowable (since it depends on who is doing commerce in what jurisdiction), and not flexible (it must be revised every time technology appears to change); hence, it is inconsistently applied (and thus it is not reasonable or certain as to what the end result will be). This lack of clarity has resulted in confusion and ignorance as to the application of law on the Internet -- to the point that it is currently driven by a "law of the jungle" ethos.

From 386bsd to OSPREY: The Evolution of an Operating System
All You Need is TCP: EtherSAN and Storage Networks
Lessons Learned in Massive Video Production (MVP) for University Alumni Outreach
Mars Colonization Vehicle (MCV) - An Earth-Mars Orbital Asteroid Transport for Mars Colonization
Global Warming Wasted Wetlands
An Analysis of the Viking Results to Extrapolate Possible Reactants from the Discovery of Perchlorates on Mars
Reaction Rates and Crystal Formations of Melamine-Cyanuric Acid Complexes in an Ammoniated Environment
Rock with a High Albedo Scattering Experiment: A Determination of Likelihood for Martian Hypolithic Bacteria
High voltage high vacuum coating
TCP/IP network accelerator system and method which identifies classes of packet traffic for predictable protocols
Term Addressable Memory of an Accelerator System and Method
Accelerator system and method
Review of Source Code Secrets
Vintage Computer Faire 2002
Before 386bsd: The Symmetric 375 Computer and Berkeley Unix
Issues in Deployment of Wireless Web Services
Open Software Development in the Real World
TV Quality Reliable Wireless Video Streaming
Before 386bsd: The Symmetric 375 Computer and Berkeley Unix

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